Don’t Believe Everything You Think!

r-yoga-large570

I have many beautiful friends. This magnificant woman refreshed my memory of truths I had forgotten. This post is a team effort from Erin Allen and myself.

“Sometimes home schooling is really hard. And sometimes there’s a nasty, mean voice that gets inside my head that whispers that it’s not going well, that I can’t do this, that I’m going to fail, and points out all the “evidence” that proves that this is just too much for me. Those thoughts were spiraling me down to a pretty dark place this morning. Then my inspired friend came over, took over the kids for a bit, and allowed me to go into my room, close the door and pray and read my scriptures. I cried and cried to Heavenly Father (literally, with tears and snot.) Then I opened up my scriptures to Ether 6:5-12. In this part of the Book of Mormon, the Jaradites are in the middle of what must have felt like an impossible endeavor… and here are the verses that jumped out at me and sunk right in:

“And it came to pass that when they were buried in the deep there was no water that could hurt them, their vessels being tight like unto a dish, and also they were tight like unto the ark of Noah; therefore when they were encompassed about by many waters they did cry unto the Lord, and he did bring them forth again upon the top of the waters.

And it came to pass that the wind did never cease to blow towards the promised land while they were upon the waters; and thus they were driven forth before the wind.

And they did sing praises unto the Lord; yea, the brother of Jared did sing praises unto the Lord, and he did thank and praise the Lord all the day long; and when the night came, they did not cease to praise the Lord.

And thus they were driven forth; and no monster of the sea could break them, neither whale that could mar them; and they did have light continually, whether it was above the water or under the water.”

I love these verses and I love how symbolic their story is to my own life, thousands of years later. There is so much that applies to me right now. I too can be protected and feel joy in the middle of trials, (whether they are external or internal trials) as I focus my thoughts on gratitude… being THANKFUL! By focusing my thoughts on the Savior! By choosing my thoughts and the things I focus on, I can protect myself with TRUTH. The truth is, I KNOW homeschooling is right for our family this year. Being “tight like unto a dish” = not letting darkness in. I can be tight and protected as I don’t indulge the negative, dark, self-criticizing thoughts that would sink me down. I love that these verses also point out that all the furious winds and waves that feel like they are out to drown me, are actually the very things that are bringing me toward the “promised land.” MY promised land. My place of peace, joy and fulfillment.

I love the scriptures and how they remind me of truth. I am grateful for prayer. I’m amazed yet again of how powerful these simple things are in helping me to feel the Truth again.

Thanks for letting me share! I love my friends and community dearly…. that means each of you.”

I loved the part that reads “the furious winds and waves that feel like they are out to drown me, are actually the very things that are bringing me toward the “promised land.” When you don’t realize the elements in your story for what they truly are it’s hard to express gratitude or feel joy But if you see, with eyes open and the scales start to fall, you will start to recognize the truth of all things. The truth can make you free to feel the beauty in all that life brings. I know that I too have felt the winds that were destroying my ship and making life uncomfortable. But as I dropped to my knees and asked God what I needed to change and what I needed to accept. He guided my path and allowed me to distinguish between the two. Then when I realized that I am the captain of my life I began to choose my circumstances, I started to see how without the winds there was no way I could get to the marvelous destination. There is a peace that comes by knowing you are doing what is right for you and your family. Then when the opposition comes… and it will because that is part of why we are here. You too can feel the peace the Savior promised to send… My peace I give you, not as the world giveth give I unto you… The world would say peace is the absence of a storm… and the Lord says I will comfort you while the storm rages around and allow you to see the necessity of the winds.

After I read my friends post I was reminded of another woman who taught me earlier that week. Here is what she shared.

Music and the Spoken Word” and she shared with me the following message from the August 13 th broadcast: “We’ve all heard the wise advice “Don’t believe everything you hear.” But there’s also wisdom in a similar idea: “Don’t believe everything you think,” because some false information may come from our own thoughts. We may think things about ourselves and others that simply are not true—thoughts like “I can never change” or “I can’t forgive this person” or “I’m not good enough” or “She doesn’t like me.” The danger of such thoughts is that they don’t stay thoughts for long. They can quickly harden into beliefs that affect the way we see the world. Soon those beliefs become actions that can limit our progress, damage our relationships, and hinder our happiness. So how do we prevent this? One approach is to treat our thoughts the way we would treat other information we might encounter. We can ask ourselves, “Is it true? What evidence do I have? Does it square with other things I already know? Is there another explanation?” We can listen to our conscience and to trusted loved ones. It takes courage and humility to evaluate our thoughts in this way because it might mean admitting that we were wrong! Is it time to debunk some myths in your own mind? A good place to start might be those negative or degrading thoughts—about yourself and about others. You can change, and so can others. You can forgive, and so can others. People might like you more than you think. And you might like them more than you think. Give your beliefs and actions the firm foundation of true, uplifting, charitable thoughts, and remember, don’t believe everything you think.”

I am thankful for the strong woman in my life. Who enrich my life and help create a fulfilling loving environment. I love their honesty, wisdom, and authenticity. I hope you liked their words as much as I did.

 

I just read this and thought of you too… its from a talk a girl gave in stake conference….
“Music and the Spoken Word” and he
shared with me the following message from the August 13 th broadcast:

“We’ve all heard the wise advice “Don’t believe everything you hear.” But there’s also wisdom
in a similar idea: “Don’t believe everything you think,” because some false information may
come from our own thoughts. We may think things about ourselves and others that simply are
not true—thoughts like “I can never change” or “I can’t forgive this person” or “I’m not good
enough” or “She doesn’t like me.” The danger of such thoughts is that they don’t stay thoughts
for long. They can quickly harden into beliefs that affect the way we see the world. Soon those
beliefs become actions that can limit our progress, damage our relationships, and hinder our
happiness.

So how do we prevent this? One approach is to treat our thoughts the way we would treat
other information we might encounter. We can ask ourselves, “Is it true? What evidence do I
have? Does it square with other things I already know? Is there another explanation?” We can
listen to our conscience and to trusted loved ones. It takes courage and humility to evaluate our
thoughts in this way, because it might mean admitting that we were wrong!

Is it time to debunk some myths in your own mind? A good place to start might be those
negative or degrading thoughts—about yourself and about others. You can change, and so can
others. You can forgive, and so can others. People might like you more than you think. And you
might like them more than you think. Give your beliefs and actions the firm foundation of true,
uplifting, charitable thoughts, and remember, don’t believe everything you think.”

I just read this and thought of you too… its from a talk a girl gave in stake conference….
“Music and the Spoken Word” and he
shared with me the following message from the August 13 th broadcast:

“We’ve all heard the wise advice “Don’t believe everything you hear.” But there’s also wisdom
in a similar idea: “Don’t believe everything you think,” because some false information may
come from our own thoughts. We may think things about ourselves and others that simply are
not true—thoughts like “I can never change” or “I can’t forgive this person” or “I’m not good
enough” or “She doesn’t like me.” The danger of such thoughts is that they don’t stay thoughts
for long. They can quickly harden into beliefs that affect the way we see the world. Soon those
beliefs become actions that can limit our progress, damage our relationships, and hinder our
happiness.

So how do we prevent this? One approach is to treat our thoughts the way we would treat
other information we might encounter. We can ask ourselves, “Is it true? What evidence do I
have? Does it square with other things I already know? Is there another explanation?” We can
listen to our conscience and to trusted loved ones. It takes courage and humility to evaluate our
thoughts in this way, because it might mean admitting that we were wrong!

Is it time to debunk some myths in your own mind? A good place to start might be those
negative or degrading thoughts—about yourself and about others. You can change, and so can
others. You can forgive, and so can others. People might like you more than you think. And you
might like them more than you think. Give your beliefs and actions the firm foundation of true,
uplifting, charitable thoughts, and remember, don’t believe everything you think.”

I just read this and thought of you too… its from a talk a girl gave in stake conference….
“Music and the Spoken Word” and he
shared with me the following message from the August 13 th broadcast:

“We’ve all heard the wise advice “Don’t believe everything you hear.” But there’s also wisdom
in a similar idea: “Don’t believe everything you think,” because some false information may
come from our own thoughts. We may think things about ourselves and others that simply are
not true—thoughts like “I can never change” or “I can’t forgive this person” or “I’m not good
enough” or “She doesn’t like me.” The danger of such thoughts is that they don’t stay thoughts
for long. They can quickly harden into beliefs that affect the way we see the world. Soon those
beliefs become actions that can limit our progress, damage our relationships, and hinder our
happiness.

So how do we prevent this? One approach is to treat our thoughts the way we would treat
other information we might encounter. We can ask ourselves, “Is it true? What evidence do I
have? Does it square with other things I already know? Is there another explanation?” We can
listen to our conscience and to trusted loved ones. It takes courage and humility to evaluate our
thoughts in this way, because it might mean admitting that we were wrong!

Is it time to debunk some myths in your own mind? A good place to start might be those
negative or degrading thoughts—about yourself and about others. You can change, and so can
others. You can forgive, and so can others. People might like you more than you think. And you
might like them more than you think. Give your beliefs and actions the firm foundation of true,
uplifting, charitable thoughts, and remember, don’t believe everything you think.”

 

I just read this and thought of you too… its from a talk a girl gave in stake conference….
“Music and the Spoken Word” and he
shared with me the following message from the August 13 th broadcast:

“We’ve all heard the wise advice “Don’t believe everything you hear.” But there’s also wisdom
in a similar idea: “Don’t believe everything you think,” because some false information may
come from our own thoughts. We may think things about ourselves and others that simply are
not true—thoughts like “I can never change” or “I can’t forgive this person” or “I’m not good
enough” or “She doesn’t like me.” The danger of such thoughts is that they don’t stay thoughts
for long. They can quickly harden into beliefs that affect the way we see the world. Soon those
beliefs become actions that can limit our progress, damage our relationships, and hinder our
happiness.

So how do we prevent this? One approach is to treat our thoughts the way we would treat
other information we might encounter. We can ask ourselves, “Is it true? What evidence do I
have? Does it square with other things I already know? Is there another explanation?” We can
listen to our conscience and to trusted loved ones. It takes courage and humility to evaluate our
thoughts in this way, because it might mean admitting that we were wrong!

Is it time to debunk some myths in your own mind? A good place to start might be those
negative or degrading thoughts—about yourself and about others. You can change, and so can
others. You can forgive, and so can others. People might like you more than you think. And you
might like them more than you think. Give your beliefs and actions the firm foundation of true,
uplifting, charitable thoughts, and remember, don’t believe everything you think.”

I just read this and thought of you too… its from a talk a girl gave in stake conference….
“Music and the Spoken Word” and he
shared with me the following message from the August 13 th broadcast:

“We’ve all heard the wise advice “Don’t believe everything you hear.” But there’s also wisdom
in a similar idea: “Don’t believe everything you think,” because some false information may
come from our own thoughts. We may think things about ourselves and others that simply are
not true—thoughts like “I can never change” or “I can’t forgive this person” or “I’m not good
enough” or “She doesn’t like me.” The danger of such thoughts is that they don’t stay thoughts
for long. They can quickly harden into beliefs that affect the way we see the world. Soon those
beliefs become actions that can limit our progress, damage our relationships, and hinder our
happiness.

So how do we prevent this? One approach is to treat our thoughts the way we would treat
other information we might encounter. We can ask ourselves, “Is it true? What evidence do I
have? Does it square with other things I already know? Is there another explanation?” We can
listen to our conscience and to trusted loved ones. It takes courage and humility to evaluate our
thoughts in this way, because it might mean admitting that we were wrong!

Is it time to debunk some myths in your own mind? A good place to start might be those
negative or degrading thoughts—about yourself and about others. You can change, and so can
others. You can forgive, and so can others. People might like you more than you think. And you
might like them more than you think. Give your beliefs and actions the firm foundation of true,
uplifting, charitable thoughts, and remember, don’t believe everything you think.”

I just read this and thought of you too… its from a talk a girl gave in stake conference….
“Music and the Spoken Word” and he
shared with me the following message from the August 13 th broadcast:

“We’ve all heard the wise advice “Don’t believe everything you hear.” But there’s also wisdom
in a similar idea: “Don’t believe everything you think,” because some false information may
come from our own thoughts. We may think things about ourselves and others that simply are
not true—thoughts like “I can never change” or “I can’t forgive this person” or “I’m not good
enough” or “She doesn’t like me.” The danger of such thoughts is that they don’t stay thoughts
for long. They can quickly harden into beliefs that affect the way we see the world. Soon those
beliefs become actions that can limit our progress, damage our relationships, and hinder our
happiness.

So how do we prevent this? One approach is to treat our thoughts the way we would treat
other information we might encounter. We can ask ourselves, “Is it true? What evidence do I
have? Does it square with other things I already know? Is there another explanation?” We can
listen to our conscience and to trusted loved ones. It takes courage and humility to evaluate our
thoughts in this way, because it might mean admitting that we were wrong!

Is it time to debunk some myths in your own mind? A good place to start might be those
negative or degrading thoughts—about yourself and about others. You can change, and so can
others. You can forgive, and so can others. People might like you more than you think. And you
might like them more than you think. Give your beliefs and actions the firm foundation of true,
uplifting, charitable thoughts, and remember, don’t believe everything you think.”

Advertisements
Don’t Believe Everything You Think!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: